Blog

Change Management - More efficiency for system implementations

One of the most common mistakes often made by many organizations is to treat their system implementations only as a technical process. Understand how a well-implemented Change Management process can avoid many pitfalls in your organization.

Analyzing a system implementation only observing its technical aspects, causes most system projects to not reach effectively the originally planned gains. When this occurs, many involved parties (especially end users) blame the new tool, saying it is not as effective or even applicable to the reality of their area.

Developers, on the other hand, claim that the tool is applicable, but the misuse of its features causes the benefits generated to fall short of expectations. This can occur due to a flawed or non-existent Change Management process during the project life cycle.

Any systemic change should always be seen as an organizational change.


Obstacle in the Change Management process

Among the most common factors that hinder the system deployment process and outreach of its potential benefits, we can highlight:

  • User resistance to change;
  • Failure to communicate potential issues that may occur during the process;
  • Company's senior management not fully engaged;
  • Users not fully prepared for the new tool.

Thus, despite all complexity involved in system deployment, we can't underestimate the impact caused by this change in the daily routine of all stakeholders. For a successful implementation, it is essential that, in addition to creating cross-functional business and IT groups, a team responsible for this implementation's Change Management is structured.

OUR CHANGE MANAGEMENT METHODOLOGY CONSISTS IN APPLYING 5 MECHANISMS, WHICH ARE AGREED BASED ON STAKEHOLDER ANALYSIS AND CHANGE STRATEGY DEFINITION, WHICH IS THE INITIAL STEP:

1. Stakeholder analysis and change strategy definition - Align what are the key drivers for change and their vision of the future, understanding key stakeholders affected, as well as defining the Change Management strategy;
2. Key stakeholder management - Identify who are all stakeholders affected by the change; establish and maintain, through engagement actions, the sponsor's network of change agents and multipliers, according to the established change strategy;
3. Impact analysis - Identify, map and address key impacts to be caused by the change - impacts are the differences between the current situation where the organization is and the new situation (future state);
4. Engagement & Communication - Provide clear communication THROUGHOUT the change process;
5. Training - Provide conditions for transmission and assimilation of knowledge, skills and behaviors, so employees can achieve, in a timely manner, the expected performance levels;
6. Support - Establish mechanisms to support changes, through governance of the new model, or even review of HR processes and policies.

Thus, when we align improvements with knowledge and engagement, project success rates tend to be higher, generating greater gains for everyone.

Therefore, we develop a tool that is more adherent to end-user needs and there is greater alignment with everyone involved, creating a sense of collective change in the company and not just in IT.

Idioma / Language